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Synthesizers

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    Sound Modules

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    Synthesis / Sound Design

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    Synth Secrets

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8 items
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    Roland SH-01A

    Synthesizer

    Roland continue to mine their considerable legacy with another Boutique module, this time based on the simple but much-loved SH-101.

    Reviews May 2018
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    Roland SE-02

    Synthesizer

    The latest in the Boutique range is the result of an unexpected collaboration between Roland and Studio Electronics.

    Reviews Oct 2017
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    Roland Sound Canvas For iOS

    Sound Module App For iOS

    In 1991 Roland introduced the company’s first Sound Canvas module, the SC55. Aimed at the enthusiast market, the SC55 offered...

    Reviews Aug 2015
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    Roland XV2020

    Synth Module

    Designed to replace the JV1010 as Roland's entry-level synth product, the XV2020 is diminutive, affordable, and crammed with those great XV sounds. But what's it like to use?

    Reviews Nov 2002
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    Roland XV5050

    Sample-based Synth Module

    Roland's latest module provides the most affordable way yet to access the company's fine XV soundset, albeit with reduced polyphony and a less intuitive user interface compared to the more expensive XV5080. We weigh up the pros and cons.

    Reviews Jun 2002
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    Roland SH32

    Virtual Analogue Synthesizer

    Roland released the JP8000/8080 virtual analogue synth way back in 1997, but never really followed it up. Now they've combined the modelling synth idea with their Groovebox concept, presenting it in compact form with a wealth of hardware control options...

    Reviews May 2002
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    Roland MC307 Groovebox

    Sequencing Workstation

    Roland followed their first MC303 Groovebox with the well-specified MC505. Now there's the MC307, with a spec more like the 505, a price closer to that of the 303, and more DJ-friendly features.

    Reviews Jun 2001
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    Roland SPV355

    P/V Pitch-to-voltage Synth (Retro)

    The SPV355, launched in the late '70s, was intended to allow the pitch of instruments such as guitars and saxophones to control analogue synth sounds — which it does with varying degrees of success. Fortunately, it has other tricks up its sleeve, as Chris Carter explains.

    Reviews May 2001
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