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Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby armans » Wed Nov 25, 2020 11:45 am

Tim Gillett wrote:Another trap for regular players is being used to the sound of the acoustic guitar as they're playing it which is usually somewhat muffled and lacking presence. A recording of the same guitar from a more front on mic position might appear too bright when it might actually be closer to how it sounds from that position.

thank you!
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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Nov 25, 2020 11:46 am

:thumbup:
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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby blinddrew » Wed Nov 25, 2020 1:29 pm

armans wrote:Just to add, my strings werent that old...well actually they were about 3 months old but considering I only play the guitar every week once or twice I would have thought that the strings should last 3 months.... I guess I was wrong... if you want even tone :(
'How long should a string last?' is almost as open a question as 'how long is a piece of string?' ;)
There are so many factors in play and so much of it is down to the player in question.
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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby armans » Wed Nov 25, 2020 1:33 pm

blinddrew wrote:
armans wrote:Just to add, my strings werent that old...well actually they were about 3 months old but considering I only play the guitar every week once or twice I would have thought that the strings should last 3 months.... I guess I was wrong... if you want even tone :(
'How long should a string last?' is almost as open a question as 'how long is a piece of string?' ;)
There are so many factors in play and so much of it is down to the player in question.

True and I am very embarresed by this problem... a real rookie mistake is to go wandering off into mic placements and microphones before you actually know enough about the instrument you are recording to know when the strings are giving you undesireable overtones
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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Nov 25, 2020 1:52 pm

I read an article by a well respected recording engineer/producer who, when a session guitarist turned up fo an acoustic session asked them if they had restrung the guitar for the session and if they said no he gave them a set of strings and docked their fee to cover the cost. His rationale was that new strings are predictable and if he needed the guy to come back a few days/weeks/months later to replace a part only new strings would sound the same as the first recording.
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Re: Are cardioid pattern microphones only good for recording at a distance?

Postby blinddrew » Wed Nov 25, 2020 2:15 pm

armans wrote:
blinddrew wrote:
armans wrote:Just to add, my strings werent that old...well actually they were about 3 months old but considering I only play the guitar every week once or twice I would have thought that the strings should last 3 months.... I guess I was wrong... if you want even tone :(
'How long should a string last?' is almost as open a question as 'how long is a piece of string?' ;)
There are so many factors in play and so much of it is down to the player in question.

True and I am very embarresed by this problem... a real rookie mistake is to go wandering off into mic placements and microphones before you actually know enough about the instrument you are recording to know when the strings are giving you undesireable overtones
I'm sure we've all been there. I certainly have (but I am a rookie) and I've also hit the related problem that Sam mentions above.
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