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Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby ken long » Fri May 29, 2020 3:17 pm

Tim Gillett wrote:In Marie O'Connell's setup the isopropanol is wiped off just after it has run over the repro head and just before the capstan. The wiping tool is actually small sections of car windscreen wiper blades.

She removed the recording head and replaced it with a felt pad attached to an IV drip.

But that's probably overkill for OP's purposes ;).
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby Tim Gillett » Fri May 29, 2020 3:37 pm

ken long wrote:
Tim Gillett wrote:In Marie O'Connell's setup the isopropanol is wiped off just after it has run over the repro head and just before the capstan. The wiping tool is actually small sections of car windscreen wiper blades.

She removed the recording head and replaced it with a felt pad attached to an IV drip.

But that's probably overkill for OP's purposes ;).
Perhaps so, but in her setup the tape is lubricated as it travels across the stationary repro head. The other surfaces are rolling with the tape apart from edge guidance. The unlubricated tape has to scrape against the head, hence the need for temporary lubrication which O'Connell's system provides.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby ken long » Mon Jun 01, 2020 12:20 pm

Tim Gillett wrote: in her setup the tape is lubricated as it travels across the stationary repro head.

As I mentioned the record head has been replaced with a felt pad connected to an IV drip. This is where the tape is lubricated in her system. I find it more practical and just as effective to apply as the tape unwinds. It usually evaporates before the playback head. IME, any residue remaining on the tape at that stage can really affect the frequency response and later, in the case of some machines, the oil in the pinch roller. I'd also add that some sticktion happens before the head block.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby James Perrett » Mon Jun 01, 2020 2:12 pm

Have either of you tried Richard Hess' suggestion of Cyclomethicone on a piece of interfacing fabric? I've got a bottle here but haven't actually used it yet.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby Tim Gillett » Mon Jun 01, 2020 2:12 pm

ken long wrote:
Tim Gillett wrote: in her setup the tape is lubricated as it travels across the stationary repro head.

As I mentioned the record head has been replaced with a felt pad connected to an IV drip. This is where the tape is lubricated in her system. I find it more practical and just as effective to apply as the tape unwinds. It usually evaporates before the playback head. IME, any residue remaining on the tape at that stage can really affect the frequency response and later, in the case of some machines, the oil in the pinch roller. I'd also add that some sticktion happens before the head block.

Yes I'm aware the tape is lubricated at the place where the record head used to be. That's why when it scrapes against the repro head, it is already lubricated, and only for that purpose, for Immediately the tape leaves the repro head, the lubrication is wiped off.

Yes there is a risk of "spacing loss" at the repro head/tape interface but as I understand it, that's the tradeoff at that point: stiction vs spacing loss. My understanding is that for such stiction problem tapes we also try to reduce the chances for stiction to the bare minimum, by removing all stationary points for the tape to scrape against (such as erase and record heads and non rotating guides), except the one we cant do without: the repro head.

Ed: James I bought some Cyclomethicone some time ago but I haven't had a stiction problem tape since which might benefit from it.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby BigRedX » Mon Jun 01, 2020 3:38 pm

ken long wrote:
BigRedX wrote:The exception was one where the glue had seeped out of the edits and was causing the tape to stick together. In that case I had to manually separate out the individual bits of tape, clean the glue off them (hoping I wasn't also removing the oxide layer) and then wind each length of tape back onto a reel for playback.

Lighter fluid is great for this.

As I discovered. I was more than a little apprehensive that it might cause the oxide layer to separate from the backing, but everything went to plan, although I did have to cut the tape back into individual tracks, clean and play each individually. Luckily this one had only been recorded at 3 3/4 ips so the tape lengths were reasonably manageable.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby ken long » Thu Jun 04, 2020 12:33 pm

James Perrett wrote:Have either of you tried Richard Hess' suggestion of Cyclomethicone on a piece of interfacing fabric? I've got a bottle here but haven't actually used it yet.

I tried this but wasn't practical to apply (used an empty marker bottle with tip) and could not be easily removed after playback. Also wreaked havoc with the pinch roller.

I still find using isopropyl the most effective and least likely to cause long term changes to the tape or the machine. I've done many of these problematic tapes but I don't feel I come across them regularly enough to mod a machine to deal with them specifically.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby ken long » Thu Jun 04, 2020 12:36 pm

Tim Gillett wrote:
Yes there is a risk of "spacing loss" at the repro head/tape interface but as I understand it, that's the tradeoff at that point: stiction vs spacing loss.

This can be avoided by applying the lubricant earlier on in the path.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby James Perrett » Thu Jun 04, 2020 1:10 pm

ken long wrote:
James Perrett wrote:Have either of you tried Richard Hess' suggestion of Cyclomethicone on a piece of interfacing fabric? I've got a bottle here but haven't actually used it yet.

I tried this but wasn't practical to apply (used an empty marker bottle with tip) and could not be easily removed after playback. Also wreaked havoc with the pinch roller.

I still find using isopropyl the most effective and least likely to cause long term changes to the tape or the machine. I've done many of these problematic tapes but I don't feel I come across them regularly enough to mod a machine to deal with them specifically.

Thanks Ken and Tim,

I've only had one batch of tapes that might have needed this sort of treatment (Agfa PEM469 from an American studio) but I'll give IPA a try next time I have similar problems.
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Re: Processing tape transfers which have speed issues

Postby Tim Gillett » Thu Jun 04, 2020 2:12 pm

I haven't tried it but others have had success with "cold play". The playback happens inside a fridge. Apparently it can help with certain tapes with what Hess calls " soft binder syndrome ".
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