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Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

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Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:25 pm
by ManFromGlass
A damp sponge on the computer keyboard keys does wonders too. Definitely a new kinda feel thing.
Although there may be no hope for you if you’re like my mom - you can tell what she had for breakfast by looking at the keys, and to touch her mouse - cripes!
:)

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 10:44 am
by Arpangel
The Elf wrote:I really know what you mean - happens to me every time!

I hated the Kronos in so many ways, but it was the best feeling non-weighted keyboard in my studio; the aftertouch was THE best I've ever had. I had a tough time letting go because of that.

Synths I regret selling? It's a blessedly short list, TBH. I really liked the simple immediacy of my Kurzweil K2000, and there are some here that know I always regretted selling my Kawai K1r - some of my very favourite layered sounds only appear when fairy dusted with K1r!

But yes, every time I line up to sell something, I give it a try and find that one reason to keep it. Sigh... :headbang:

Gear I regret selling?

EMS VCS3 with DK2 Keyboard.
Sequential Pro 1
Juno 6
Yamaha DX7 MK1
BEL BD80S Delay once owned by Tony Arnold and used by Robert Fripp
Eventide H3000 X2
MM 16-2 mixer
Delta Labs Effectron
Lexicon 224

:cry:

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 10:55 am
by R_A
Arpangel wrote:Eventide H3000 X2
Lexicon 224

:cry:

Ouch!

My regret is more modest - an Oberheim Matrix 1000. Whenever I have to dig back into old stems I always think... Ooops.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:12 am
by The Elf
Arpangel wrote:Gear I regret selling?
Sequential Pro 1
Ouch! That's one synth I have never, in my wildest dreams, considered selling. I now have two - both with superb replacement keyboards, LFO LEDs and one with sublime purple LEDs! Mmm...

Arpangel wrote:Juno 6
When it was the only polysynth I could afford I grew to hate it. TBH I still don't have much affection for them, though I've softened a bit. Once I heard a JX-8P I never looked back. if you still mourn your 6, then try a System-8 in Juno-106 guise - it's close enough for my ears.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:18 am
by Arpangel
The Elf wrote:
Arpangel wrote:Gear I regret selling?
Sequential Pro 1
Ouch! That's one synth I have never, in my wildest dreams, considered selling. I now have two - both with superb replacement keyboards, LFO LEDs and one with sublime purple LEDs! Mmm...

Arpangel wrote:Juno 6
When it was the only polysynth I could afford I grew to hate it. TBH I still don't have much affection for them, though I've softened a bit. Once I heard a JX-8P I never looked back. if you still mourn your 6, then try a System-8 in Juno-106 guise - it's close enough for my ears.

I loved the chorus on my J6, is the System 8 really any good? I heard it was very cold and digital sounding, in fact, it seems impossible to stop it sounding really fizzy and bright.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:31 am
by R_A
Arpangel wrote:I loved the chorus on my J6, is the System 8 really any good? I heard it was very cold and digital sounding, in fact, it seems impossible to stop it sounding really fizzy and bright.

I've had a play with the Roland vsts (and I'm presuming that the same technology is at work in the System 8). The most useful feature I found on the plug was being able to tweak the chorus. I sometimes find the chorus on my old 106 to be too wibbly wobbly.

I thought the sound of the 106 plug was almost identical to the real thing.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:35 am
by The Elf
Arpangel wrote:is the System 8 really any good? I heard it was very cold and digital sounding, in fact, it seems impossible to stop it sounding really fizzy and bright.
You always will hear this kind of nonsense. Maybe these 'experts' couldn't find the filter cut-off knob? No recreation of anything will ever be good enough for the Internet, and some will shout loudly about it. The trick is to make up your own mind.

I bought an S8 and went back to the studio to make music. It's a poor piece of hardware by Roland's heyday standards, IMO, but it sounds fine to me - I haven't had any letters from listeners to tell me they miss my JP-8...

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:41 am
by Arpangel
The Elf wrote:
Arpangel wrote:is the System 8 really any good? I heard it was very cold and digital sounding, in fact, it seems impossible to stop it sounding really fizzy and bright.
You always will hear this kind of nonsense. No recreation of anything will ever be good enough for the Internet, and some will shout loudly about it. The trick is to make up your own mind.

I bought an S8 and went back to the studio to make music. It's a poor piece of hardware, IMO, but it sounds fine to me - I haven't had any letters from listeners to tell me they miss my JP-8...

All I know is that I’d be very wary of buying a S8 based on what I’ve heard, certainly not without giving it a good trial first. And that four octave keyboard, no.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:44 am
by The Elf
Arpangel wrote:And that four octave keyboard, no.
Yes, that's poor, I agree, but use your ears...

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:48 am
by Arpangel
The Elf wrote:
Arpangel wrote:
The Elf wrote:
Arpangel wrote:is the System 8 really any good? I heard it was very cold and digital sounding, in fact, it seems impossible to stop it sounding really fizzy and bright.
You always will hear this kind of nonsense. No recreation of anything will ever be good enough for the Internet, and some will shout loudly about it. The trick is to make up your own mind.

I bought an S8 and went back to the studio to make music. It's a poor piece of hardware, IMO, but it sounds fine to me - I haven't had any letters from listeners to tell me they miss my JP-8...

All I know is that I’d be very wary of buying a S8 based on what I’ve heard, certainly not without giving it a good trial first. And that four octave keyboard, no.
Yes, that's poor, I agree, but use your ears...

I’ve got keyboards that have great sounds, like my Micron, and my Reface, I bought them for the sounds, and hate the actual synth, simply because of the keyboards, I’d never do that again, they just don’t get used because of that. I can’t be bothered to Midi everything up to another keyboard.
Regarding the S8, I have used my ears, and I’m not hearing anything I like, simple as that.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:49 pm
by BillB
Gordon's review of the System-8
https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/roland-system-8
concluded:
So there we have it. It’s made of plastic, it has an external power supply, it has questionable aesthetics, its keyboard is at least an octave too short, it lacks aftertouch, it lacks an XLR microphone input and its documentation is poor. But great sounds just pour out of it. Which of these is more important? You decide.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:30 pm
by nathanscribe
Arpangel wrote:Gear I regret selling?

...
BEL BD80S Delay once owned by Tony Arnold and used by Robert Fripp
...

:cry:

I bet you go *king crimson when you think about that.

Sorry, I'll get my coat. :silent:

On topic, I've sold a lot of really good gear because I didn't get along with it. Simple as that. It can sound great, but if I don't like the experience of using it, I won't, and it'll hang about a while and then go. Rarely, I buy them again later. Mostly not though. Luckily I've not sold anything that's gone up in price so much I'd have to part myself out to have again.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 10:24 pm
by James Perrett
Arpangel wrote:BEL BD80S Delay once owned by Tony Arnold and used by Robert Fripp

I recently found out that my big Tannoy monitors have the same pedigree.


As I've mentioned before, I regret getting rid of my old Philicorda organ when I did but it was just being used as a mixer stand in my studio. Just a year or two later Blur used one and then their value went from zero up through the roof.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 10:40 am
by Arpangel
James Perrett wrote:
Arpangel wrote:BEL BD80S Delay once owned by Tony Arnold and used by Robert Fripp

I recently found out that my big Tannoy monitors have the same pedigree.


As I've mentioned before, I regret getting rid of my old Philicorda organ when I did but it was just being used as a mixer stand in my studio. Just a year or two later Blur used one and then their value went from zero up through the roof.

Yes, I went to "Arnys Shack in Poole Dorset, just before it closed, and picked it up. What a great place, had a big old Raindirk desk, lots of lovely stuff.

Re: Golden rule of selling a keyboard.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 11:27 am
by Stephen Bennett
I only regret selling my Jupiter 6 because I could sell it for more now! It never gelled with me.

I bought a 'basic' Variax guitar. Sounded great and played better than my LP and Strat. But I decided I wanted the whammy bar version so I sold it to buy one.

No matter how I tried, I could not get the new one to play as well as the 'basic' model. I had no problem selling that one on.

I regret selling my Fender Venus 12, but I did't really need it. Lovely looking thing though.

I gave my Moog Source to a frequaintance to have a look at as it wasn't powering up.

Unfortunately, they passed away that same night and I couldn't bring myself to ask for it back and by the time I thought it was OK to do so, I'd lost contact with his family.

I miss my old MK II Rhodes. I have a MK 1, but I actually prefer the keyboard on the II.

Stephen