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Recording Levels In Logic ???

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Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby DigitalMusicProduction » Mon Nov 30, 2020 5:01 pm

Hi

Regarding volume outputs and level meters when recording in Logic, noticeably there are many volume controls when in the recording process which can become confusing, i seem to be working with 4 volume settings in Logic on a Mac.

Instrument volume / Master volume / CFX Concert grand volume and Mac volume. I seem to have produced an overall decent volume from previous recordings, however to be absolutely sure I'm doing the right thing to render a professional recording, what are the standard recording levels i should be complying with?

Thanks.
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Re: Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby desmond » Mon Nov 30, 2020 5:05 pm

If you’re dealing with a virtual instrument, the only levels you’re concerned with is the level of that instrument in the mix, controlled by its own channel fader, and the overall level of the mix, controlled by the level on the stereo output channel.
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Re: Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby DigitalMusicProduction » Tue Dec 01, 2020 3:11 pm

desmond wrote:If you’re dealing with a virtual instrument, the only levels you’re concerned with is the level of that instrument in the mix, controlled by its own channel fader, and the overall level of the mix, controlled by the level on the stereo output channel.

I'm sure volume is a personal choice, however I've heard the term 0.1db is a standard volume to record at?

As an example in Logic on the virtual instrument track when recording at 0.1db and the master at 0.1db, after bouncing i needed to turn the volume up more than half way to justify a decent volume level.

I then attempted a second recording at 0.3db for the VI track and 0.9db on the master, this time on playback the volume gage was set only half way with a more robust volume but not to the point of any distortion.
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Re: Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby desmond » Tue Dec 01, 2020 3:16 pm

DigitalMusicProduction wrote:I'm sure volume is a personal choice, however I've heard the term 0.1db is a standard volume to record at?

No, I think you're confusing things you've heard, probably from the old days where people would master there mixes to just below 0dBFS. But we don't live in the old days for CD anymore.

DigitalMusicProduction wrote:As an example in Logic on the virtual instrument track when recording at 0.1db and the master at 0.1db, after bouncing i needed to turn the volume up more than half way to justify a decent volume level.

I don't really understand what you're doing here, as your "0.1db" value doesn't mean anything. If you mean "-0.1dbFS" (which is different) and your meters are hitting just below digital max, *and* you still need to turn things up, you have your monitoring system configured badly.

DigitalMusicProduction wrote:I then attempted a second recording at 0.3db for the VI track and 0.9db on the master, this time on playback the volume gage was set only half way with a more robust volume but not to the point of any distortion.

Can you upload a screen shot of the mixer while the track is playing so I can see the track levels and the mix levels in the meters?
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Re: Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Dec 01, 2020 3:24 pm

DigitalMusicProduction wrote:...I've heard the term 0.1db is a standard volume to record at?

I'm afraid you either you heard them wrong, misunderstood what was being said, or they were talking nonsense!

The phrase is meaningless, mostly because you're using dB (note capital B) as an absolute value without stating the reference. And as such, the number is meaningless.

For example, do you mean -0.1dBFS -- fractionally below digital clipping? or 0.1dB VU -- just on the nominal operating level of a system? or what?

There is a defined terminology associated with most specialist activities, and audio recording is one of them. Without understanding and consistent use of that terminology there is no meaning or common understanding, and the exchange of information is impossible.

But regarding recording levels, it is generally good practice to work with average levels floating around -20 to -15dBFS, and the highest peak levels no higher than -6dBFS (I usually aim for -10dBFS). That approach allows plenty of headroom to match the way analogue systems work, and makes recording and mixing a lot less stressful. It also works better with mixing loudness for streaming services, and it generally sounds better too as the preamps and monitor chain aren't being over-stressed.

However, most Virtual Instruments are configured to peak very close to 0dBFS and factory presets are generally much too loud to sit comfortably in a mix working with the sensible levels outlined above. So in most cases I find it necessary to either turn down the volume of the VI itself, or introduce a gain plugin to reduce the level to something more sensible.
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Re: Recording Levels In Logic ???

Postby DigitalMusicProduction » Tue Dec 01, 2020 4:38 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:
DigitalMusicProduction wrote:...I've heard the term 0.1db is a standard volume to record at?

I'm afraid you either you heard them wrong, misunderstood what was being said, or they were talking nonsense!

The phrase is meaningless, mostly because you're using dB (note capital B) as an absolute value without stating the reference.

Apologies for my lack of terminology causing confusion, you are quite right in your response, I'm new to music production, also thank you for that very helpful infomation,

And thanks to Desmond.
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