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Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

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Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby dubbmann » Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:17 am

Hi all

I was on the Rolling Stone web site and saw this very topical article that i'm placing below. I hope the mods will allow. The article explains the impact that Corona may have on the music biz since we're just now entering the peak touring calendar. It's particularly bad in the US because of our horrible private health care system, which I've known first hand and seen its impact on many creative types from musos to artists to writers, most of whom might work part time at jobs that don't provide health insurance. If I never attend another benefit concert for some musician who is fighting a dread disease w/o insurance, it can't happen soon enough.

My favorite take-away from this article is the idea of going online and buying merch from your favorite small/starting bands - t-shirts, etc. The biggest surprise I got from it was the Justin Timberlake turns out to be a stand-up guy. When he suspended a tour for his voice he paid everyone involved their salaries during the shutdown. I don't like his music but that was very cool.

Stay well,

d
.................................

How Coronavirus Is Destroying the Livelihood of Music’s Behind-the-Scenes Workforce
As the COVID-19 outbreak threatens live music everywhere, crew members, venue workers, and many other employees are struggling to pay their bills

By SAMANTHA HISSONG

Paul Klimson, a veteran audio engineer who’s worked with artists like Justin Timberlake, the Roots, and Eric Clapton, was putting together a docket of upcoming shows across multiple venues last week. Then, suddenly, they were all axed in one go. A “text came through that wiped out $11,000 in gigs between now and at least April 8th,” Klimson tells Rolling Stone.

Klimson is one of thousands of behind-the-scenes figures in the live music business who’ve found themselves in limbo as the rising tide of COVID-19 cases cancels and postpones tours, shows, and festivals at a frenetic pace. For the significant number of people employed as independent contractors — tour managers, directors, and accountants, instrument technicians, lighting technicians, soundboard operators, and others — their jobs often simply do not exist without concerts.

Take tour manager Chris Brunton, for instance, who tells Rolling Stone he lost out on four weeks’ worth of touring shows, appearances, promo trips, and the Junos, Canada’s equivalent of the Grammys.


Or Caitlin Ray, a tour merchandiser, VIP coordinator, and production assistant, who says she receives 100 percent of her income from touring. In a matter of 12 hours, she had two comedy tours — Adam Sandler and Sebastian Maniscalco — postpone, and multiple one-offs cancel.

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When Rolling Stone reached Matt Schmitz — tour manager for Irish singer-songwriter Eden, stage manager for Maggie Rogers, and production manager for Santigold — he was sitting in London, having just learned that all seven remaining dates of Eden’s European tour had been canceled after President Trump’s confusing travel-ban announcement. “Even though this ‘travel ban’ doesn’t apply to U.S. citizens, it wasn’t clearly mentioned in his statement, and everyone freaked out,” he says. “Now I head back to L.A. to reorganize. I’m honestly not entirely sure what to do.”

These names just represent the tip of a vast iceberg of impacted livelihoods. Here are a few other reasons why the situation is so devastating.

Worst possible timing
Touring work is seasonal. Things slow down in the winter, and spring typically marks the start of a busy period. By the time festival season starts in March and April, wallets are light and workers are eager to get going. “This is right when things are supposed to be ramping back up after the lean months,” says Bryan Scheckel, a production manager who’s worked with Childish Gambino, Passion Pit, and Vampire Weekend. “People expect the cash flow to start again right about now.”

For travel companies in the music industry — those entities that handle an array of touring logistics, including decisions surrounding hotels and flights — the impact can be more extensive, since this type of work is usually done months in advance of a tour. “Working on large-scale tours often requires additional hires six to nine months ahead of the tour,” says Madison House Travel agent Lisa Pomerantz. “We do not see any of that money until that performance happens. The hotels and airlines pay commission to us. In the event of a cancellation due to an injury, pregnancy, or pandemic, etc. — not only do we not get paid, we have to fight to get our client out of contracts so they don’t have to pay the hotel vendors. It is literally two times the work for no pay.”

The effect on her part of the music business has been dramatic, Pomerantz says. “Our industry went from manic to not a single email or phone call in the course of five days. Our company makes about 80 percent of our revenue from March to September. At the moment, we are looking at a third of that being completely wiped out. Additionally, we have strong concerns about receiving commissions from hotels that have already hosted our bands. Since hotels are running at 10 percent occupancy when they were expecting 95 percent, you can bet paying their teams and overhead is going to come way before paying commissions owed.”


According to Pomerantz, every single one of her peers who works with stadium-level acts has had to lay off between 25 and 50 percent of their teams.

Freelance workers weren’t able to plan — or get health care
Within the touring community, freelancers are arguably hit the hardest. “We don’t really have access to some of the support systems you might want at a time like this,” says Scheckel, the production manager. “We aren’t unionized, like a lot of musicians and local stagehands. There isn’t really a ‘roadie advocacy group’ that I’m aware of. Most of us don’t have great health insurance, and don’t have access to unemployment insurance or anything like that.”

“To my knowledge, there is not an industrywide safety blanket for disasters such as this, to cover lost income,” adds Jonathan Carrizales, Chase Rice’s production manager and front-of-house engineer. “This industry operates with many freelancers, who are contracted in to accomplish many of the high-stakes jobs, being paid directly by the tours.”

In the past, an artist’s management would often pay the crew when a tour was cut short — as opposed to being canceled before the start date — but this happens less and less often. “There is no guarantee of timeframe or pay unless you have a contract with the production, and I can speak for the majority that most do not,” says Candice Rukes, who has toured for 15 years, mainly as a production coordinator, road manager, and wardrobe manager. “When I was on tour with Justin Timberlake on his last Man of the Woods tour, he went on vocal rest for an extended amount of time. We were sent home, but he continued to pay us in full until the tour resumed. We are forever grateful for him and his team — but this is rare.”

“Some touring crew are indeed on salary if their client, the artist, does well enough to keep them paid year-round,” one former tour manager and festival producer, who asked to remain anonymous, notes. “I’d love to know the percentage of folks who are independent contractors versus salaried. To be blunt, the former, which I was for my 12 years on the road, are completely f***. Their clients would love to pay them to not work, but their clients also currently have no income.”

Even if you work for a specific venue, you might not be on salary. Kieran Blake, the general manager of New York’s Bowery Ballroom, says that venue’s house crew is “not exactly salaried, so all their livelihoods are affected — all the bartenders, the barbacks, box-office personnel. Bartenders are paid a certain salary, but they’re largely paid on tips. It’s not like they’re being laid off, but they’re not going to be earning a salary while this is going on. And beyond that, we’ve got six to eight security guards on a night who are all on an hourly [wage] who will not be getting paid without these shows. Coat checkers, box office, and merch tellers are all people who rely on these — some of the younger kids work multiple venues, and all these jobs are gone for the foreseeable future.”

“I’ve already seen massive layoffs from vendors, working to stop themselves from going belly up,” adds Christian Coffey, tour director for Run the Jewels, Childish Gambino, and A$AP Rocky.

As in all industries, independent contractors or “gig workers” don’t receive employment benefits like retirement plans, vacation time, or health insurance. Making matters worse, Trump’s tax plan put a $10,000 cap on what were once unlimited deductions for state and local taxes. “Keep in mind, independent contractors are usually underinsured and can write off less expenses than ever with Trump’s tax plan,” says the former tour manager and festival producer. “It’s not a new thought for the working poor in America, but with no income and no insurance, we’re looking at middle class, formerly full-time workers going into inescapable debt just for breathing in a public place.”

“I hope that all involved in this industry, myself included, can learn from this experience and have better safeguards put in place should this happen again,” adds Caitlin Ray. “Whether it be access to health care, reworking contract clauses to encompass epidemics, or paying more mind to our savings accounts.”

Alternate income sources are scarce
Many people who work in live events only work in live events. Artists might work as a bartender or backline technician to make money when they don’t have shows lined up, but those day jobs are now made difficult or impossible.

Nashville independent artist Meghan Hayes, who has worked as a nurse practitioner in the past, is an exception in that respect, but even she may be out of luck. “Frankly, I can’t just step back into being a nurse practitioner,” she says. “At this stage, that’s probably not going to happen. It’s just the way that Tennessee is. It’s not like I can just decide to go and volunteer during the coronavirus outbreak.”

“With most of the people who I know that have second jobs, their backup work is in bars, restaurants, and music venues,” Hayes continues. “They’re getting hit doubly hard. These guys can’t work from home.” She mentions the 5 Spot, a Nashville club that just recovered from losing power due to the recent tornado: “They reopened last night, and then, this morning, they shut it down for 30 days as a precaution against the coronavirus.”

Brandon Blackwell is a production manager, front-of-house person, and monitor engineer who has friends and peers who haven’t worked since October and now have to wait for an undetermined time to go back out. “I think what the coronavirus will teach us touring professionals is that we need multiple lines of income for when stuff like this happens,” he says. “We can’t be on the road forever.”

Scheckel has a degree in political science. He used to do campaign work, and with it being an election year, he’s thinking about revisiting that path. The Iowa resident may also go out to the family farm for planting season. “I think I’ll start by working on projects around the house, maybe look at some additional training in my field,” he says, “and eventually pick up work wherever the gig economy will have me.”

Many others are facing this same challenge. “Normally, I’d pick up work at local venues or do consulting or drafting or other tour-adjacent work, but there really isn’t any of that to be had in an industrywide halt,” he continues. “My girlfriend tours, so basically the entirety of our household income relies on shows happening.”

It’s not uncommon to find couples who got together on the road, meaning that right now entire household incomes are pulverized. “My husband and I both tour,” says one small-business owner who provides technical services in the touring industry: Larger gear vendors receive tour contracts and hire these two as contractors to run the gear throughout the tour, under their LLC. “We own our own business, we 1099 every vendor we work with,” says the business owner. “We cannot collect unemployment because we do not qualify. We now have zero income for the next 30 days minimum, most likely more, and we are having to tap into what we have saved up from last year’s tours.”

Moving forward
Tour manager John Lessard works with an artist who had planned to play shows for radio stations in New York and Maryland; both stations canceled. A decrease in opportunities for radio exposure could lead to a decrease in the discovery of that artist’s music, which means less sales and streams. “Radio is a very important component in the country-music format, and this may be the one time an artist can put a face with the name of a station head and build a great working relationship going forward. These rapports are key for the artist to get their music to the station’s listeners.”

Already, new solutions are popping up. In South Korea, an array of free concerts are appearing online to lift spirits during quarantine. According to Quartz, the Seoul Philharmonic Concert recently performed a Beethoven symphony via a live broadcast on YouTube, “as part of a government campaign to offer comfort to people during the coronavirus epidemic.” Seoul’s Sejong Center for the Performing Arts is also working on a similar approach.

As for what’s happening in America, Meghan Hayes points Rolling Stone to a Facebook Live event put on by the Wild Ponies. It was free, but they posted a Venmo address for tips. “That’s been a relatively common one,” she says. “People have been doing that here for tornado relief.”

In the case of Nashville, Hayes also suggests petitioning the mayor and local government to give out-of-work people job opportunities in the form of tornado cleanup. “People who went through the tornado need help. People who are going to be affected by all the music changes need help. We should see if there are any local opportunities for people to get hired, even if it’s in different fields than their primary ones. I think a lot of people would rather do something than nothing if they have a mortgage.”

And, as she indicates, there’s always merch: “I know that a lot of people — myself included — have posted things saying, ‘Hey, if you have a favorite artist, they’re affected by this. Either they are or they will be. So, if you could possibly buy their merchandise instead of what you’d spend on going to a concert, that would be great.’ We’ll see how much the general public is willing to say, ‘I’m not spending my money on concerts right now. I’ll spend it on a T-shirt.’”


Web-based fundraising also offers some potential relief. The 5 Spot has a GoFundMe campaign going so that staff can make it through whatever period of time they’ll need.

Cormac Larkin — a musician, writer, broadcaster, and one of the founders of the Improvised Music Company, Ireland’s leading promoter of jazz and world music — has taken to GoFundMe in response to the current crisis: “We are asking members of our audience who can afford it to consider supporting the artists who would have been coming to play in Kilkenny by making the donation they would have made if they had been in the room. We will set up a separate fund each week, which will go directly to the musicians who have their gigs canceled, until further notice.”

Almost everyone Rolling Stone talked to says that one of the scariest factors in this situation is simply the uncertainty surrounding everything. But the music industry is a collaborative one, and its members will do everything they can to get past this. “Will it be two weeks, two months, or two years?,” asks Chris Alexander, tour manager for Texas band Whiskey Myers. “I feel like our fans will get cabin fever after a couple of weeks, and when they do let us play, we will blow the f*** doors off these venues. For now, all I can do is go home to my wife and son and be the best dad and husband I can be. I’ll enjoy that time there and be ready when we can hit the road again and do what we love for a living.”
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:42 am

I sympathise deeply with the situation, but it's not the only industry -- and its employees and freelancers are not the only people -- being affected disastrously by covid-19 and the global measures being taken to try and deal with it.

This is a completely unprecedented situation; we've seen nothing remotely like it at any time in the last 100 years.

It appears that many governments are beginning to put plans in place to help support people in financial need as a result of lost jobs and continuing overheads. Time will tell if that's enough, but it's certainly very worrying. I think we all owe it to each other in our communities to be as supportive as we can in whatever ways we can for the duration.

For those that survive this ordeal, the world will be a quite different place. Perhaps the inherent recklessness of the gig economy, and the lack of built-in protections will no longer be acceptable or tolerated... That would be a good outcome!

We certainly live in interesting times.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby The Red Bladder » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:10 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:We certainly live in interesting times.

We live in idiotic times!

C19 will kill a few thousand.

This mass hysteria will kill far more! Poverty kills!

This mass hysteria will knock about 20% off our GDP. That kills people!

More people are going to die through neglect by the NHS and other health systems because they are preoccupied with dealing with this non-crisis. They will do so by delaying cancer operations and delaying preventative inspections and such things as prenatal care.

Governments around the world are being stampeded into over-reaction by media over-hype and the over-reaction by generation snowflake.

I've just had C19 and it is nothing! Most people will not even realise that they've got it or just assume that they caught a bit of a cold or that they are hung-over from a wild night with a scarlet-woman from Grimsby.

I've taken dumps that were more life-threatening than this rubbish!

Every year some 10,000 to 20,000 die from the flu in the UK. Where's the panic?

One-third of all children aged eleven are morbidly obese. Where's the panic?

But no! C19 is so serious that we have to close down our travel and tourism industry (10% of GDP) and nearly all car and truck manufacturing in Europe has had to cease (5%) - I could go on!

Live music in the UK is a £4bn industry - it has been closed down. And for what?

Perhaps if we had persuaded the good people of Wuhan to not eat pangolin, bats and snakes, as well as marmots, birds, monkeys and dogs, we could have avoided all this nonsense!

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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby desmond » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:30 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:I've just had C19 and it is nothing! Most people will not even realise that they've got it or just assume that they caught a bit of a cold or that they are hung-over from a wild night with a scarlet-woman from Grimsby.

I've taken dumps that were more life-threatening then this rubbish!

Every year some 10,000 to 20,000 die from the flu in the UK. Where's the panic?

I've had similar thoughts but as far as I'm aware, there are a few differences (please correct me if I'm wrong on these points):

- My ageing (in otherwise good-health) parents can (and do) catch the flu, and get over it. However, if they catch C19, the likelihood of them dying from it seems much higher, because:-

- This new virus we don't yet have much immunity (or treatments/shots) for, unlike the regular flu, which remains in the wild and unchecked, and infecting, what, *millions* (or at least hundreds of thousands) of people daily. Yes, high risk groups can succumb to regular flu (usually with underlying other health conditions) but generally we can resist regular flu better than C19.

- C19, unlike the flu, is not (yet) nearly as widespread as the regular flu - we're seeing, what, hundreds of cases daily, rather than the millions of flu infections. (2600 cases in England, population 56m).

This is *because* we are, what some may call, over-reacting, in order to *prevent* C19 getting to the stage where it's infecting hundreds of thousands daily, rather than hundreds. *If* that did happen, the death rates may be *way higher* than regular flu, which is what we want to prevent.

Basically, my risk of catching flu, or C19, is low if I go outside and am reasonably careful. However, if I *did* catch something, the risk of potentially killing my parents by popping round for tea is widely different between the two. I'm not really worried too much about my own health by catching this - I'm worried about passing it on to people who are more susceptible.

To a certain extent, the way to control these things and prevent them from becoming extremely severe *is* to be cautious and take (sensible) preventative measures. It may prove in time we were *too* cautious if things die down and return to normal, but returning to normal is what we want, and if we didn't take preventative measures, maybe we wouldn't have returned to normal at all - in what case, what we're doing now seems wise.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby shufflebeat » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:42 pm

Your aging parents will also be protected from "normal" flu by the immunity of those around them who will not be the conduit by which the virus reaches them.

With SARS CoV2 this is not the case.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby The Red Bladder » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:43 pm

Or to put your post in simpler terms - don't pop round for tea until a cure or an inoculation has been developed!

Simples!
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby shufflebeat » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:45 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:I've just had C19 and it is nothing!

Much of what you say is true but it doesn't support this statement, which is nonsense.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby shufflebeat » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:46 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:Or to put your post in simpler terms - don't pop round for tea until a cure or an inoculation has been developed!

Simples!

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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby desmond » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:49 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:Or to put your post in simpler terms - don't pop round for tea until a cure or an inoculation has been developed!

Yes. Hence the whole self-isolation thing, and the reason people are reducing their interactions with other people, and making more of an effort to not catch or spread the disease by social interactions or contact. Which is what is affecting business.

No doubt that, should this whole thing die down and we return to somewhat normality, then everyone will be complaining about over-reacting, and the costs and the loss of business, earnings, and the inconvenience etc. However, the cost of *not* over-reacting could be way higher, and we might well have dodged a major bullet.

We'll probably never know for sure.

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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby IAA » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:59 pm

More people are going to die through neglect by the NHS and other health systems because they are preoccupied with dealing with this non-crisis. They will do so by delaying cancer operations and delaying preventative inspections and such things as prenatal care.

This is a very real risk given we have major reconfigurations of primary care (try getting an appointment now) and all elective care (all Ops will be put back for possibly 6 months or more if the NHS creaks more than expected). More worryingly you need to appreciate that the ENTIRE focus of the NHS is now Covid-19. Literally unless you’re in the back of an ambulance it will be hard to get a proportionate response to what most healthcare needs are. Given that in this country our survival rates for cancer were pretty poor comparatively, this will not help at all. I wouldn’t be surprised to see mortality rates from the cancers and possibly a range of other conditions deteriorating as a consequence. Now if this has all been modeled through, fair enough, but I doubt it......

On saying all of the above, the majority of staff in the NHS are truly heroic and I don’t blame the planners, but this is a long game. We can’t sustain red alert/major incident levels of activity and vigilance for months. Things will go wrong.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby Watchmaker » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:23 pm

The best thing we can hope for is that unenlightened self interest will be killed off and people will learn empathy.

You may not like the fact that humanity is frail and lousy at predicting the future, and that reactions tend to far outweigh circumstances, but that is who we are.

There is no realistic alternative for the health industry. Decades of mediocre decisions and pandering to an ignorant public have taken all good options off the table, and now there is no reason to bemoan the fact that everyone dies, even baby boomers.

The collapse of such a system may not be a bad thing. Humans will survive, economies will be reconstructed. Short-sighted and unequal systems of distribution will come back. Patience is all that is required. And for an unfortunate portion of the population, grieving as well. C'est la vie.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby blinddrew » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:37 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:We live in idiotic times!

C19 will kill a few thousand.

This mass hysteria will kill far more! Poverty kills!
Let's do some simple maths.
To get effective herd immunity we need >60% of the population exposed and recovered. 70% is better but let's run with 60%.
UK population is approx 65m people. 60% of that is approx 40m people.
Covid-19 death rate in South Korea is about 1%. I'm using SK as an example because they've got the best combination of a high test rate and non-totalitarian state.
So multiply that death rate by that exposure rate and you get 400,000 dead in the UK alone.
That's more than a few thousand in my book.

In order to get time to develop a vaccine we need to slow down the spread of infection, hence the social isolation. Yes, there will be knock-on effects, some of them will be catastrophic, but so are the effects of not taking it seriously. It's not the same disease as flu and conflating the two risks seriously undermining the effectiveness of the measures being put in place.

I'm glad that your symptoms have been mild and you're recovering well. Mine have also been largely mild but I'm still waking in the middle of the night gasping for breath and I can't go up two flights of stairs without a break in between.
I'm 45 with no underlying health issues.

I'm also, like a lot of other people, showing up on no statistics anywhere because we haven't got a robust testing regimen in place. In the UK we have no idea of how widespread the virus is, the actual recovery rates or the actual mortality rate. Claiming otherwise is nonsense.
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:08 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:I've just had C19 and it is nothing!

Unless you've had the two proper tests and have received confirmation of the presence of the virus or antibodies, you just can't make that claim. There are lots of perfectly ordinary cold and flu bugs floating around at this time of year and lots of people have them right now.

I pointed out those same typical 'seasonal flu' death counts earlier, but the important difference is that those needing hospital interventions for seasonal flu appear over a 3-4 month period, and the NHS can (just about) cope with that.

In contrast, the transmission/infection rate of C19 is so phenomenally high that the risk is tens of thousands of people will need hospitalisation all at the same time, across just a few weeks. No medical system anywhere in the world can cope adequately with that kind of load...

And, as you say, if the entire hospital sector is trying to cope with serious C19 cases, other medical conditions go untreated.

So, hugely damaging though it is to many industries, businesses, and individuals, there really is no alternative way of minimising the transmission/infection rate of this unprecedented disease -- to give the hospitals a chance of being able to cope -- than to minimise and limit exposure.

Hopefully, everyone will be sensible about it, in which case maybe the restrictions can be relaxed a bit... If not, we'll be going into a European lock-down situation in the near future.

Whatever happens, it seems the world will be quite a different place afterwards. Maybe there will be changes for the better....

Perhaps Nurses will get paid the £100k a year they deserve, and stockbrokers will retrain to do something useful and productive like fill in the potholes and recycle domestic waste... :wtf: :lol:
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby The Red Bladder » Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:25 pm

This place really has turned into Mumsnet!
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Re: Impact of C-virus on music business - musos, venues, and supporting folks

Postby Forum Admin » Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:37 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:... there really is no alternative way of minimising the transmission/infection rate of this unprecedented disease -- to give the hospitals a chance of being able to cope -- than to minimise and limit exposure.

I can imagine Boris will shift the UK soon into a total lockdown scenario. Supermarkets and pharmacies open, as in France and Italy. It's the only way to minimise the spread before it really gets a foothold.

And we need to be testing everyone. Appreciate that's a mammoth/gargantuan task.

Worth having a look at this SOS news story if not already read it:
https://www.soundonsound.com/news/mpg-push-covid-19-relief

Stay safe!
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