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soprano and piano

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Re: soprano and piano

Postby Arpangel » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:57 am

Peevy wrote:
Hugh Robjohns wrote:Professionally trained can mean surprisingly loud (when appropriate to the material)! Be ready with the mic pad switches on any close mics!

Hi Hugh

Yes, another secret fear revealed! The SDCs that I’m planning to use don’t have pad switches. I have a couple of inline attenuators (-10db I think?) I’ll get a couple more, or is there a better alternative?

The two multi pattern LDCs for the omini main pair do have pads so that’s covered.

I’ve been thinking again about a closer mic for the vocal. I think I will set one up, just as a security blanket, even if a tiny amount of it is used or not at all. If I do, would a good starting position be a SDC about waist height pointing up?

Thanks again. :)

Is she singing from a score? My instinct here would be to have the vocal mic high, pointing down, why? I believe it encourages a better performance, if the mic is at waste height she’ll be tempted to sing down into it, which can restrict the throat, more inspiring to sing looking up, if any of this makes sense, I’m a singer too, and I know mics can be like cameras, you can’t help sing in their direction.
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Re: soprano and piano

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:43 am

Peevy wrote:The SDCs that I’m planning to use don’t have pad switches. I have a couple of inline attenuators (-10db I think?) I’ll get a couple more, or is there a better alternative?

It depends on what is likely to overload first, the mic's impedance converter or the preamp. Back in my day, many capacitor mics had quite limited headroom and you had to pad down the mic itself when a powerful singer was belting directly into a mic.

That's much less of an issue today as most modern mics have a pretty healthy headroom, but it's worth checking the max SPL spec for your mics to see what might be the most appropriate choice. If the preamp goes first -- as it might if your mics are high-output types -- then an inline pad is a good solution if the preamp doesn't have an pad switch. 20dB is a more common default value, but 10dB will usually be enough to save the day.

But this overload risk is more something to be aware of, rather than a likely scenario. You'd need a very loud singer and an unusually close mic to have a real problem.

If I do, would a good starting position be a SDC about waist height pointing up?

That's the stock position for public concerts because it keeps the mic out of the sight lines, but for a dedicated recording I'd prefer to go high and come in from slightly above the singer, if I had a suitable mic stand...
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Re: soprano and piano

Postby The Red Bladder » Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:51 pm

Piano and voice - I've done a ton of these with video and here are my pointers -

1. Those domestic cameras all drift, so you MUST slate the front and back ends of the video. Do this so that the slate can be seen by all cameras. If some are not looking at the same spot, just switch them all to record and slate one after another. A clapper board is best and most accurate, but a handclap will also do.

2. If the piano is anything like ours, it's going to be bloody loud, so close-mic it and use an SM58 on the voice to keep the piano sound down in the voice mic as far as possible.

3. The video editor can squeeze and stretch the video in Premier or Resolve. Do not let him/her mess with the audio by squeezing/stretching or there will be horrible phase problems! Resolve can do an auto-sync using the audio, but Premier cannot.

4. Remember to hit 'White Balance' on the cameras before going into record!
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Re: soprano and piano

Postby Peevy » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:18 pm

Thanks Arpangel and Hugh.

Recommendations duly noted. Will try spot higher up.

Hugh, the F8 preamps don’t have a pad switches, so I’ll make sure to have in-line attenuators at the ready :)
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Re: soprano and piano

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:37 pm

You probably won't need them, but always good to be prepared. :D
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