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February 1999 Magazine Contents

Reviews

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    ASC Studio Traps

    Portable Room Acoustic Baffles

    Studio Traps allow you to alter the acoustics of any room in minutes, so you can quickly deal with troublesome rooms or acoustically separate live mics from one another.

    Reviews
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    Doepfer Regelwerk

    MIDI Fader Box & Step Sequencer

    Fancy having 24 assignable faders and 72 buttons to control your MIDI gear? How about an eight-track MIDI step sequencer with CV and gate outputs too? Paul Nagle explores a product that gives you both.

    Reviews
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    Kurzweil K250 (Retrozone)

    Workstation Keyboard

    Philip Meehan fondly remembers his first love — a keyboard with the voice of an angel, the mind of a genius, and the body of a heavyweight boxer in a big black coat.

    Reviews
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    Line 6 Pod

    Physical Modelling Guitar Preamp

    Can this intriguing little box really emulate the recorded sound of many of the world's greatest guitar amplifiers?

    Reviews
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    Ramsa WR-DA7

    Digital Mixer

    Hugh Robjohns has a close encounter with Panasonic's newly launched budget digital console, and finds it up there with the best of them.

    Reviews
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    Synton Fénix

    Patchable Semi-modular Analogue Synthesizer

    Two Dutch designers who were influential in the design of the cult '80s Synton Syrinx synth have recently returned to the field, coming up with the exclusive and highly idiosyncratic Fénix synthesizer.

    Reviews
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    Tascam DA45HR

    24-bit DAT Recorder

    A 24‑bit, high‑resolution version of the DAT format allows users of 24‑bit workstations to transfer their mixes using readily available, cheap media.

    Reviews

Techniques

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    Recording Cher's 'Believe'

    Mark Taylor & Brian Rawling

    It was the best-selling single of last year, and signalled a radical change of musical direction for Cher — complete with bizarre vocal processing. Yet, surprisingly, it was produced in a small studio in West London. Sue Sillitoe relates the astonishing tale of 'Believe'.

    Techniques

People

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