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Studio One: Buffers & Low-latency

PreSonus Studio One Tips & Techniques
Published March 2018
By Larry the O

Screen 1: The Audio Device preferences pane. A nice, short, 32-sample buffer is in use here, yielding perfectly workable latencies of less than a millisecond.Screen 1: The Audio Device preferences pane. A nice, short, 32-sample buffer is in use here, yielding perfectly workable latencies of less than a millisecond.

With Studio One’s advanced features, latency need not be a problem.

When audio data is moved around, it absolutely must be received and played on time, or bad things happen. In DAWs, this stability is ensured by the use of a buffer, a short-term ‘staging area’ your processor can use like counter space in a kitchen to make processes more efficient. But this buffer turns out to sit at the centercentre of competing priorities, a fact that has engendered no small amount of confusion around buffer size settings.

The Fundamental Problem

Recording is impacted by buffer size because buffering necessarily introduces latency (delay) in monitoring the source, and monitoring delay is difficult to stomach when recording a performance. It also complicates the use of virtual instruments, which get delayed as well. Small buffer sizes create less delay, so...

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Published March 2018