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Logic Pro X: Making The Most Of Amp Designer

Apple Logic Pro X Tips & Techniques
By Paul White

Get the most out of Logic's Amp Designer plug-in.

I know a number of Logic users who have tried Logic's Guitar Amp Designer plug-in, skimmed through the presets, and then dismissed them as less authentic than some of the third-party options. That may not be entirely fair, as with a little perseverance, it is possible to coax some extremely usable sounds out of it.

In order to achieve a  stereo signal chain for a  mono guitar input, you'll need to use a  stereo channel with the Direction Mixer plug-in inserted first in the signal path. This allows you to send your DI'ed guitar to different left/right processing setups.In order to achieve a stereo signal chain for a mono guitar input, you'll need to use a stereo channel with the Direction Mixer plug-in inserted first in the signal path. This allows you to send your DI'ed guitar to different left/right processing setups.As a rule, amp modelling works well enough for clean sounds and also for heavily distorted, edgy rock sounds — it's when you want something that falls in-between the two that you have to work a little harder. While the focus on this Logic workshop is on getting the most out of Amp Designer, I like where possible to put some analogue pedals before the input to my audio interface rather than relying on Logic's pedalboard for everything. Pre-conditioning the sound using a light overdrive is a good start if you're after a bluesy/classic rock sound — or use your favourite compressor pedal if you need a clean sound. As well as ensuring you have the right input impedance, using analogue pedals helps round off any sharp peaks that might cause brief converter clipping, which in turn makes the attack of the notes sound more natural. And don't be tempted to push your record levels too high — peaking at around -10dBFS is more than loud enough.

The Duality Of Mono

One of the more useful additions to Logic Pro X is the ability to call up certain plug-ins in Mono, Stereo or Dual Mono mode. If you call up a Dual Mono plug-in you'll see L and R tabs that let you view and adjust the left and right channels independently. This opens up some interesting creative possibilities, particularly when it comes to guitar processing.

To make use of these Dual Mono plug-ins, we need a stereo channel — even though the guitar input (or...

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Published November 2019