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July 1994 Magazine Contents

Reviews

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    Novation BassStation

    Analogue Bass Synth

    Given the scarcity and high prices of Roland's seriously trendy TB303 Bassline, the field has been wide open for enterprising manufacturers to fill the demand for a cheap and funky bass synth. Novation's BassStation is but the first of three contenders.

    Reviews
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    Oktava MK012 microphone

    Oktava MK012

    Capacitor Microphone

    Oktava have created a storm in the microphone marketplace with the MK219. Now they hope to follow up their initial success with the MK012, designed for both studio and broadcast use.

    Reviews
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    Roland SDX330

    Dimensional Expander

    Everyone is looking for that elusive extra dimension to their mix, and Roland's latest unit claims to deliver it right out of the box. Dave Lockwood assesses dimensional expansion for himself.

    Reviews
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    Waldorf Wave

    Analogue/Digital Dynamic Spectrum Wavetable Synthesizer

    Waldorf's dream machine is finally off the drawing board and in the real world, and looks sure to set synth players' hearts beating a little faster.

    Reviews
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    Yamaha VL1

    Virtual Acoustic Synthesizer

    Is 'physical modelling' set to become the buzz-phrase of '90s synthesis? Martin Russ exclusively tests out Yamaha's innovative new synth and reveals all...

    Reviews

People

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    Malcolm Toft: MTA & Trident

    Analogue Excellence

    Paul White talks to Malcolm Toft, the man behind the legendary Trident range of recording consoles, who now has his own company, MTA, which looks set to continue the tradition of analogue excellence.

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    Stephen Street: Recording Blur & The Cranberries

    Producer

    With a track record that includes hit albums for the Smiths and current chart success with both Blur and the Cranberries, producer Stephen Street is making himself quite a name for his honest and straightforward production approach.

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    The Grid: Evolver

    Richard Norris & Dave Ball

    Take some Cajun banjo, an Italian opera singer, and a dash of Robert Fripp. Mix these diverse elements liberally with electronic dance music, and serve as the third album from the Grid, Evolver. Nigel Humberstone talks to the hi-tech duo on the making of this album, and their forthcoming classical project.

    People
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