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Studio One: Duck Tales

PreSonus Studio One Tips & Techniques
Published February 2018
By Larry the O

Screen 1. Bass, drums and guitars are all routed to a ‘music sub’ bus to be ducked by the vocal submix.Screen 1. Bass, drums and guitars are all routed to a ‘music sub’ bus to be ducked by the vocal submix.

Get your Studio One ducking techniques in a row as we explore different ways to improve vocal intelligibility.

Your drums, guitars, synth pads, organ tracks and brass samples are all nicely balanced, but the vocals keep getting lost in places. Automating the vocal level to sit it on top of the mix, adding brightness with EQ, and beefing up the compression are all options, but none of them is a silver bullet that works in all situations. When other methods fail, I frequently turn to ducking, something I have written about before in this column. This month, I discuss different ducking techniques, how they can be set up within Studio One, and how they can be stored as presets.

The Teal Thing

The core idea of ducking is to trigger gain reduction of one or more target signals whenever a source signal (in this case, the vocal) is present. If the aim...

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Published February 2018